Snowify

Snowify

SNOWIFY is a tool I created early 2013 that allows the user to generate thick packs of snow on any prop.
For when a simple snow shader isn’t enough.

It started of as a hobby project; I had just had to make a snow level for work (more precisely, a snowed version of an existing level), for which I had created a couple of simple snow shaders (using the angle of the surface normal to determine snowiness).
But when making that level, I found that in some cases it would have looked better if the snow had a volume, rather than being flat.
So afterwards I came up with an idea to create snow meshes based on the mesh of the object it was resting on, and started working on a tool to do that in my spare time.

Since I nowadays work primarily in the Unity3D engine, I made this tool for use in Unity.

houses with snow

The tool allows for complete control over the snow’s thickness, angle, direction, material, smoothness, and various other settings.
The snow meshes are also automatically unwrapped and textured.

jeep with snow

It’s available on the Unity Asset Store.

RocksARocksA2
RocksBRocksB2
RocksCRocksC2

Edit:

Snowify was used by Hinterland Studios for the creation of their game “The Long Dark”:
http://unity3d.com/showcase/case-stories/the-long-dark
(it’s being listed as one of their favorite packages from the Unity Asset Store)
Darkplace

Projection Correction

Some time ago I had to take a bunch of screenshots of the TTS VR for advertising purposes.
They needed a lot of screenshot for various formats (web banners, magazines, …),
so they tend to recrop the screenshots I send them a lot, depending on the need and space,
because of that I have to add some extra space outside of the actual screenshots, which I simply do by increasing the fov of the camera I render the screenshots with.

The thing is though, that the higher the fov, the more perspective distortion you get away from the center.
(a logical result for a projection of a 3d space onto flat plane)
This isn’t essentially a bad thing though, it’s actually correct, if the image is viewed from straight in front of the center, and at the right distance, so it’s looked at with the same angular size as the image was made (the fov).

The problem, is that these screenshots sometimes get cropped in extreme ways, by which I mean, far to one side, moving focus away from the center.
This causes the image to look strange, as the content is skewed and stretched.

So I decided to make something to counter that.

I figured that if the 2d space that was projected on was a spherical shell instead of a flat plane, there would be no distortion.
A spherical shell however can not be mapped to a flat plane without distortion (obviously, just look at maps of the earth),
but, a cylindrical shell totally can.

So, using math and logic (whoo) I created a post effect that manipulates the image as if it was projected on a cylinder (with either a horizontal or a vertical axis), and then unfolded.

This way it can make sure there is no distortion either horizontally, or vertically, depending on whether the image is in landscape or portrait.
Because of this, you can move focus in this direction (horizontal or vertical), without it looking off.
A side effect of this is that you can easily stitch together screenshots made by rotating around the cylinder-axis.

rendered with projection correctionAn extreme example, the horizontal fov is more than 200 degrees, this isn’t even possible with normal rendering (only <180 degrees).

FullCorrection

There are a few setbacks however,
firstly, unlike normally (projecting on a flat plane), not all straight lines (in 3D) are straight in the image, some are curved,
secondly, a lot of space is wasted in the image (the black parts), because of the extra cylinder-mapping, which means you have to render at a higher resolution for the same detail.
and lastly (and definately least), there is no filtering done in the cylinder-mapping, so the result can be a bit jaggy (and moreso the bigger the fov is).

I also made a second mode, which is a bit simpler and less extreme,
as it only streches 1 of the axes, just so proportions look correcter. This one is actually more difficult to explain, just look at the pictures.

SimpleCorrection

I’ve made this post effect available for free on the Unity Asset Store:

https://www.assetstore.unity3d.com/#/content/9882

It requires a Unity Pro license in order to work though.